Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" Butterick 6258 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

I haven’t sewn much this month — not due to lack of sewjo as much as having more pressing concerns. So I am suuuuper glad I have a backlog of things to show you! Yay for being productive in December and January. This Butterick B6258 top I made in December, after I learned about Jungle January IV. Staying away from the animal print fabrics after getting that news is like trying not to think about a pink elephant, you know?

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" Butterick 6258 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

The fabric, though fun, is terrible. Really poor quality. I bought it back when I bought fabric for how it looked and not how it felt. It’s a cotton knit, pretty stable with not too much stretch. It feels flat and crunchy, like paper, and it’s thin without being supple. I made leggings from this fabric two or three years ago, and they grew more comfortable with washing and wearing, but the print chafed at the thigh and the legs/butt/knees bagged awkwardly after prolonged wearing.

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" Butterick 6258 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

Since this shirt won’t last forever, I thought I’d have fun with the details. Finishing necklines takes time and energy, so I merely folded and twin-needle stitched it before closing the second shoulder. On the front, I attached a cute little pocket. Pockets everywhere! I’ve been wanting a tiny pocket shirt for quite some time.

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" Butterick 6258 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

When I began sewing, I loved raw edges and wrong sides. These cuffs are a throwback to my earlier style; not only did I use the wrong side of the fabric for a contrast cuff, but I left all its edges raw. And the cut edge and exposed seam allowances are all untreated. I tacked the cuff in place in two spots to minimize stitching and maximize rawness.

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" McCall's 6078 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

This other top is an even older make, but it’s purple and it’s kind of animal print, right? Seriously, I really missed participating in Jungle January this year. I just couldn’t find an animal print in my stash that I hadn’t already sewn up, and I’m on a pretty strict fabric diet right now. I can buy, sparingly, from two or three of my four local options, but I can’t order anything online. It’s possible I’m going to need to downsize drastically in the coming months, to the point where I sell off/give away some of my stash, so there’s no point getting much more.

McCall's M6078

The body of this top is my faaaavorite pattern, McCall’s M6078. I haven’t sewn it again since this version, but it would work great in rayon jersey for spring 2016! Anyway. SewCraftyChemist asked me on Instagram, what pattern I used to add sleeves to this sleeveless top. In the process of digging up that info — Butterick B5166 — I thought it would be fun to see if it was a fluke that the two patterns worked together, or if they actually fit each other.

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" McCall's 6078 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

I think they work together pretty well — what do you think? I did have to gather the sleeve a bit to the armhole, but it makes for a fun design feature. And it kind of beefs up my shoulders, so they don’t get lost in the shuffle like normal. I’m not sure how I’d feel about the puffiness if I had broad shoulders. Is that the sort of feature you play up or play down? Or simply accommodate?

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" McCall's 6078 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

I road tested this top to determine what kind of creative and fancy hem I was going to devise. In the end, I did a fold-and-stitch hem. Sometimes you just want to finish the darned thing so you can wear it!

"Purple Animals: Two Wild New Shirts" McCall's 6078 top – Making the Flame | Body Positive Sewing & Style

I have worn it here and there, but I must say: it’s not the go-to I imagined. The garish color and busy print make it surprisingly hard to coordinate with the rest of my work clothes…and I don’t know that I want to wear this with my casual outfits. I may donate it.

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3 Comments

  1. I love the cowl drape of the second one alot. I have the same problem sometimes trying to coordinate my wardrobe together at times. I really should sew more solid colored things lol

    1. Hi Tasha, sorry I’m just seeing this now! My new blog set up doesn’t email me when I have comments (boooo).

      Anyway, you’re so right! Solids are definitely a necessary part of a complete wardrobe…unfortunately, hah. I need to get on the ball with that, but you had a really nice solid wardrobe builder, that brown turtleneck with the leather hem.

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